Soundscape

The term soundscape indicates the set of all those acoustic components that characterize a given place at a given time. For example, in the morning at dawn, in a marshy environment, it will be full of songs of the various acrocephalus, in close connection with the period. In May we will have both the choir of the breeding birds such as Great Reed Warbler, Reed Warbler, sometimes the Savi’s Warbler and the voices of some migratory birds, as can be the Sedge Warbler or more rarely the Common Grasshopper Warbler. In the distance you will hear the song of the Blackbird, but also the drumming of the Great Spotted Woodpecker. The Scops Owl will still be singing with the last calls of the night. Above all, however, it will dominate the Nightingale, with its powerful and extremely varied warbling. The set of all these songs, calls, verses and noises emitted by the various animals, is the so-called Biophony.
Sometimes, however, there will be a train that will pass a few kilometers further on, a plane that will inevitably fly over the area, a farm tractor being worked on the ground. These last sounds and noises emitted by humans will be the Anthropophony.
As soon as a bit of wind rises, the reeds will start to sway, the leaves touching each other rubbing each other. Along a ditch the water will produce its characteristic gurgling as soon as it changes level crossing a small sluice. All these “noises” give rise to Geophony.
Definitely, our marshy soundscape, as well as all soundscapes in general, will be constitutive of the totality of these three sets: Biophony, Anthropophony, Geophony.

Soundscape including some elements that exemplify the presence of the three aspects described above: Biophony, Anthropophony, Geophony

Soundscape Total time 1’45”.
0’0″Start with the song of the Blackbird with the rustling of the leaves moved by the wind;
from 5″ to 27″ calls of young of Grey Heron at the nest feeded by the adult who at 27 “flies away with the characteristic “silence call” towards the nestlings;
10″ storm with thunder in the distance;
34″ motor mower approaching and following disappearance;
from 44″to 1’00” car in transit from right to left;
at 1’03” cannon shot aid in agriculture as it scares birds;
from 1’09” sound of bells, wind in the leaves, thunderstorm;
at 1’18” Icterine Warbler in song in the background.


EXAMPLE OF SOUNDSCAPES

LESSINIA SOUNDSCAPES

OTUS SCOPS – CHORUS AT DAWN

BLACKCAP AND GREAT TIT – CHORUS AT DAWN

YELLOW BILLED TOAD AND TREE FROG